Category Archives: Indoor

Cineraria

Cineraria

A well-grown Cineraria (Senecio cruentus) is always a welcome in your home. Masses of Daisy-like flowers cover the soft, heart-shaped leaves and the color range is impressive – white, blue, pink, purple and red varieties are available. The showiest strain is the Grandiflora group – large-flowered plants about 18 in high. The tallest Cinerarias are varieties belonging to the Stellata group, reaching a height of 2 ft or more with small, star-shaped flowers. At the other end of the scale is the Nana group, small and compact, with masses of brightly-colored flowers.

Buy plants with some open flowers and masses of unopened buds. They shoud last for 4-6 weeks. Unfortunately, Cineraria can be a disappointing plant and will colapse in a week or two in a hot room or if it is not watered properly.

Enjoy In The Garden Room!

Enjoy In The Garden Room!

The dividing lines between greenhouse, conservatory and garden room are vague, and experts disagree over the definitions. It is best to regard a greenhouse (or glasshouse) as a structure made entirely or mainly of glass or transparent plastic and which is entered from the garden. It is arranged almost exclusively for the comfort of the plants rather than for the people who tend or look at them.

A conservatory is similar in physical appearance with glazed walls and roof but is generally more ornate than the standard greenhouse. The basic difference, however, is that entry is generally through the house and there is provision for people to sit and enjoy the plants. Still, the beauty and welfare of the plants and their arrangement are the key factors.

Low Light Indoor Plants

Low Light Indoor Plants

Low light house plants are always on the wanted list for indoor gardeners. You may be thinking that all houseplants are low light tolerant, but this isn’t necessarily so. Although there are many shade tolerant plant varieties that have been re-named house plants, at the same time, many plants grown specifically for the indoors, still require a fair amount of light.

First off, let us define low-light, without getting too technical.
If you need a torch, night-goggles, or have to switch on the overhead lights – this is a dark area. Plants do not grow in the dark. In a low light area, if you can still cast a shadow – not talking silhouettes here, there are plants that will in fact grow in this amount of light. Don’t bother going any darker than this, just brighter.